Artists

Ian Cattanach [Biography]

Ian Cattanach

Originally trained in Design and Fine Art in England, Ian Cattanach has explored and developed sculpture as a means of capturing powerful and meaningful moments in time. His sculptures project the majesty of nature, reflecting the energy of life in movement. He strives to capture not only the perceptible but also the subtle and complex forces that make up such unique moments. As well as the ‘natural world’ his work also explores human nature, modern life and its impact.

Since I can remember I have drawn, painted and sketched with a certain eagerness and ease, something which my parents and tutors noticed very early on - My father was a painter and keen artist who started me off with oil painting at the age of eight. Since those early days it was hard to find me without some artists materials in my hands.

At the age of sixteen I attended NORCAT (Norfolk College of Arts and Technology), where I was to become immersed in every medium I could ever imagine. I studied fine art, ceramics, technical/graphic design, and was introduced to every aspect of creativity from photography to sculpture. I took keenly to sculpture while at the same time keeping a strong hand in design. I proudly hit the local headlines representing the success of the College with a large steel eagle, which I had created out of scrap metal; obviously my love of birds of prey had already taken root in my art.

My fine art abilities and my technical design strength won me places at Yarmouth College of Design and Norwich School of Art - I had to decide which route I would take. After long consideration I decided to go to Norwich where I was to be immersed in an almost classical training in fine art.

The years that followed led to a great deal of travel and making a living for myself as a professional. I worked as a studio photographer, Illustrator, graphic designer, film producer, photographic journalist and event organiser, all the time growing more and more into the field of digital media. I went on to work in television and headed several international communication projects. However, the more I immersed myself in this technically dictated lifestyle the less time I had for the development of my art.

Eventually in 2007 I decided to pull out of the hectic life in the media world and return to something close to my heart - sculpture. I had been applying my training in fine art throughout my career and found that my return to sculpture was easier than I had anticipated, I decided to pick up where I had left of and once again turned to birds of prey for inspiration. An extraordinary event took place on Table Mountain shortly after my arrival in Cape Town, which was to inspire me to capture the great Black Eagle in bronze. The peregrine falcon is another of my favourite subjects and I spent some months studying these two creatures at close quarters. Photography and video helped me understand the fine complexities of these birds in both their form and function. I developed a particular sculpting style adapted precisely to capturing these birds of prey in a way that stole nothing from their lightness of form, their strength or their vitality. I aimed to capture powerful moments in these birds’ lives and hold that moment forever in bronze.

Since I started sculpting in South Africa I also took a new interest in abstract form and with this in mind I started exploring negative space, an element which had already found its way into my ‘birds of prey’ pieces. The use of abstraction combined with negative space excites me as a means of capturing more than the simple form of a creature or person, it is a means of capturing something of the essence of that being, a stripping away to the very core, allowing meaning to grow in the mind of the beholder.

I am currently creating a series of bronze sculptures following my work with birds of prey and hope to soon have a series based on the life of the Peregrine Falcon depicting its many habits and movements. I am also making exciting new discoveries in my abstract work. I enjoy exploring the human form, in both movement and meaning, using simplicity and negative space.

As well as my own work I also undertake commissions of almost any style, shape or size.

Additional Information & Completed Work

Galleries - My work has been available at the following South African Galleries:

Gallery 909, waterfront, Cape Town
Bordeaux Gallery, Main Street, Franshhoek
Focus Contemporary Gallery, Long Street, Cape Town
Ebony Gallery, Main Street, Franshhoek
The Cellars Hotel, Constantia, Cape Town


Collections - My work now forms part of private collections in the following places:

London, United Kingdom
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Paris, France
Johannesburg, South Africa
Cape Town, South Africa
Franshhoek, South Africa


Current Commissions - Commissioned work currently underway or nearing completion include:
Child’s Bust - Life-size Private Commission.
The Charmer - Life-size 15 on Orange International Hotel, Cape Town.
The vanguard - Life-size 15 on Orange International Hotel, Cape Town.

Ian Cattanach

Originally trained in Design and Fine Art in England, Ian Cattanach has explored and developed sculpture as a means of capturing powerful and meaningful moments in time. His sculptures project the majesty of nature, reflecting the energy of life in movement. He strives to capture not only the perceptible but also the subtle and complex forces that make up such unique moments. As well as the ‘natural world’ his work also explores human nature, modern life and its impact.

Since I can remember I have drawn, painted and sketched with a certain eagerness and ease, something which my parents and tutors noticed very early on - My father was a painter and keen artist who started me off with oil painting at the age of eight. Since those early days it was hard to find me without some artists materials in my hands.

At the age of sixteen I attended NORCAT (Norfolk College of Arts and Technology), where I was to become immersed in every medium I could ever imagine. I studied fine art, ceramics, technical/graphic design, and was introduced to every aspect of creativity from photography to sculpture. I took keenly to sculpture while at the same time keeping a strong hand in design. I proudly hit the local headlines representing the success of the College with a large steel eagle, which I had created out of scrap metal; obviously my love of birds of prey had already taken root in my art.

My fine art abilities and my technical design strength won me places at Yarmouth College of Design and Norwich School of Art - I had to decide which route I would take. After long consideration I decided to go to Norwich where I was to be immersed in an almost classical training in fine art.

The years that followed led to a great deal of travel and making a living for myself as a professional. I worked as a studio photographer, Illustrator, graphic designer, film producer, photographic journalist and event organiser, all the time growing more and more into the field of digital media. I went on to work in television and headed several international communication projects. However, the more I immersed myself in this technically dictated lifestyle the less time I had for the development of my art.

Eventually in 2007 I decided to pull out of the hectic life in the media world and return to something close to my heart - sculpture. I had been applying my training in fine art throughout my career and found that my return to sculpture was easier than I had anticipated, I decided to pick up where I had left of and once again turned to birds of prey for inspiration. An extraordinary event took place on Table Mountain shortly after my arrival in Cape Town, which was to inspire me to capture the great Black Eagle in bronze. The peregrine falcon is another of my favourite subjects and I spent some months studying these two creatures at close quarters. Photography and video helped me understand the fine complexities of these birds in both their form and function. I developed a particular sculpting style adapted precisely to capturing these birds of prey in a way that stole nothing from their lightness of form, their strength or their vitality. I aimed to capture powerful moments in these birds’ lives and hold that moment forever in bronze.

Since I started sculpting in South Africa I also took a new interest in abstract form and with this in mind I started exploring negative space, an element which had already found its way into my ‘birds of prey’ pieces. The use of abstraction combined with negative space excites me as a means of capturing more than the simple form of a creature or person, it is a means of capturing something of the essence of that being, a stripping away to the very core, allowing meaning to grow in the mind of the beholder.

I am currently creating a series of bronze sculptures following my work with birds of prey and hope to soon have a series based on the life of the Peregrine Falcon depicting its many habits and movements. I am also making exciting new discoveries in my abstract work. I enjoy exploring the human form, in both movement and meaning, using simplicity and negative space.

As well as my own work I also undertake commissions of almost any style, shape or size.

Additional Information & Completed Work

Galleries - My work has been available at the following South African Galleries:

Gallery 909, waterfront, Cape Town
Bordeaux Gallery, Main Street, Franshhoek
Focus Contemporary Gallery, Long Street, Cape Town
Ebony Gallery, Main Street, Franshhoek
The Cellars Hotel, Constantia, Cape Town


Collections - My work now forms part of private collections in the following places:

London, United Kingdom
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Paris, France
Johannesburg, South Africa
Cape Town, South Africa
Franshhoek, South Africa


Current Commissions - Commissioned work currently underway or nearing completion include:
Child’s Bust - Life-size Private Commission.
The Charmer - Life-size 15 on Orange International Hotel, Cape Town.
The vanguard - Life-size 15 on Orange International Hotel, Cape Town.

Address

Oberon Gallery
'The Lanes'
27 Loseby Lane
Leicester
LE1 5DR

Various events will take place throughout the year during evenings & weekends. Please stay connected to us via the website and social media for details. We very much welcome other businesses to contact us to arrange collaborative events that will benefit both business and clients.

Contact

T: 0116 253 8484
E: info@oberongallery.com

Gallery Manager:

Opening Hours

Monday                  10:00 -17:00pm

Tuesday                  10:00 -17:00pm

Wednesday            10:00 -17:00pm

Thursday                10:00 -17:00pm

Friday                     10:00 -17:00pm

Saturday                 10:00 -17:00pm

Sunday                   CLOSED

Opening times will vary according to evening and weekend events and activities. Loseby Lane retailers generally close for bank holidays. Please check our social media for bank holiday opening time announcements. 

For any out of hours enquiries please email info@oberongallery.com

 

© Oberon Gallery 2018

Website by artlook